Books to be excited about in 2017

33652490    May 9, 2017

Murakami’s new short story collection, “Men without Women” promises to be tales about men from all walks of life ending up alone. From the descriptions it strikes me as a Murakami version of ‘This is How You Lose Her’ and I cannot be more excited for this release! I’m sure it will be as beautiful and surreal as all of his books have been.

For those that haven’t read Murakami previously – he is like reading a dream you’ve almost forgotten but thoroughly enjoyed.

29906980  February 14, 2017

“Lincoln in the Bardo” is a novel that takes place over the course of one night. When Abraham Lincoln buries his son Willie, he later returns to his grave under the cover of darkness. Visited by ghosts and written in what I can only assume will be the usual lovely prose of Saunders, Lincoln in the Bardo promises to be haunting in the best sense of the word.

33151805  May 2, 2017

Guilty pleasure alert! If you need to escape into a good thriller occasionally, Paula Hawkins might be a good author to start picking up. “The Girl on the Train” was interesting while being slightly disturbing, so I can only hope that Hawkins pushes that instinct further in her newest novel, “Into the Water.” A story about a single mother who ends up dead at the bottom of a river and the daughter (and secrets) she leaves behind – I am excited to hibernate away a weekend with this read in May.

25489134  January 10, 2017

Not long to wait for this debut novel by Katherine Arden. ARC reviews have been raving over this novel seeped in Russian fairytales with a little of Cinderella’s stepmother mixed in. A young girl named Vasilisa grows up honoring the spirit creatures around her due to the guidance and fairy tales of her nurse.  But when her mother dies and her father remarries, the city-bred woman he brings home demands they stop their traditions, which brings misfortune on their village. When crops fail and danger befalls her home, Vasilisa must make a choice to save them, even if it goes against everything her Stepmother wants. A story that promises to be full of magic, history and a touch of rebellion, “The Bear and the Nightingale” sounds like a wonderful read for the new year.

30644520  January 3, 2017

This book hits the shelves tomorrow and a lot of fans of Roxane Gay can’t wait. A collection of stories of women from different paths, from a stripper to an engineer, are what makes up this new release. Narratives that explore the intricacies of sibling relationships, marriages and friendships through self deception, love and societal expectations  – “Difficult Women” sounds like a sharp edged dive into the lives behind incredibly interesting fictitious women in modern America.

 

For fans of the Dresden Files and the Kingkiller Chronicles, both of the newest releases have yet to have a definite date so we will just continue to wait. (Not that we’ve waited impatiently for years already but… oh wait, yes we have.)

Obviously there are tons of great books to be excited about in 2017 but these are just a few I’m looking forward too! I’d love to hear what everyone else is excited for, so please feel free to comment/message me.

Happy New Year!

 

The Twelve Days of Dash and Lily

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Remember Dash & Lily? Kismet in the Strand Bookstore in NY! Mysterious notebooks, book love and adventures!

Dash and Lily found each other through a series of challenges left by Lily in a red moleskine notebook at the Strand in Dash & Lily’s Book of Dares, the original novel by Rachel Cohn & David Levithan. Extremely cute and clever, it gave us bibliophiles the warm and fuzzies all the way to the last page.

Now we have our sequel, The Twelve Days of Dash & Lily. Set one year after Dash & Lily fall for each other, fans of their first escapade will notice the change in tone in the initial few chapters. Quite serious and a bit sad, the book begins with Lily trying to take care of her grandpa after he has a heart attack. She isn’t her usual optimistic self, isn’t excited for christmas and to make matters worse, she and Dash seem to have drifted apart in their relationship.

When Lily ditches school, runs away from her family and feels completely unreachable; Dash decides it’s time to intervene. He arranges a set of clues to lead Lily on her own adventure. Each clue rekindles her joy in christmas and leads her back to him, and all those who love her.

Though not as warm or wondrous as the original – Dash & Lily enthusiasts will appreciate this second dose of the adorable pair. This bittersweet sequel is worth picking up to experience what happens next in their story. It brings back a little of that unique Dash & Lily magic to get you in the spirit for the holiday season.

And, fair warning, it might make you deathly afraid of glitter.

My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry by Fredrik Backman

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“Only different people change the world,” Granny used to say. “No one normal has ever changed a crapping thing.”

Elsa, 7-years-old, is astonishingly bright, creative and outspoken. These qualities lead her to be bullied at school and friendless. At home Elsa lives with her mother who is expecting a baby and has a new partner.  She doesn’t see her father as much as she wishes, he also has a new family. So she feels left out of both of her families in different ways and is an outcast at school.

Her grandmother is who Elsa’s world revolves around. She is her best friend, taking her on adventures and telling her tales about the Land of Almost-Awake and the Kingdom of Miamas where everybody is different like Elsa and nobody needs to be normal to fit in. Her grandmother does whatever she can to brighten Elsa’s day, whether it’s telling her fantasical stories, playing imaginary games or breaking into the zoo at night to show her the monkeys.

When Elsa’s beloved grandmother passes away, Elsa is left feeling alone and completely lost. Then her grandmother’s letters begin to appear, leading Elsa to people in her building that she didn’t know well before. Each letter is her grandmother apologizing for something, which helps Elsa to learn about her grandmother’s past and how she is connected to each recipient of the letters.

Through these letters Elsa experiences her own quest and expands the world she lives in to include new friends, neighbors and true stories that bring the fairy tales from the Land of Almost-Awake to life in a way Elsa never knew could be true.

Humanity in all it’s imperfections and varied challenges appear in Elsa’s letter delivery exploits.  An alcoholic, a well meaning cookie making couple, a overly fastidious neighbor (Britt-Marie! I wish I had read this book first!), a lurking dangerous figure and even a very large dog who becomes Elsa’s sidekick and protector.

“My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry” is not just about an incredible bond between a young girl and her grandmother seeped in fairy tales and imagination. It is a beautiful testament to the strength of stories, kindness, helping others, looking beyond first impressions and knowing that everyone has their own personal struggles.

I absolutely loved this book. Elsa’s grandmother is a superhero of the type that every child should have. Someone to encourage them to be creative and brave and adventurous but also tell them the truth and protect them no matter what. Her grandmother is hilarious, getting into all kinds of trouble but always with the best intentions. As her grandmother’s past unfolds and the stories of those around Elsa are revealed, we learn how wonderful and varied a life her grandmother truly had.

This wonderful novel about second chances, love, family and the magic of a well told tale is a must-read for anyone who loves to laugh, and believes each and every one of us could use a superhero in our lives.

Britt-Marie Was Here by Fredrik Backman

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Britt-Marie is a woman with challenges. A bit OCD, a bit unaware of social graces, a bit awkward and overly straight forward – Britt-Marie is easily misunderstood. She gives suggestions that come off as criticisms, she doesn’t easily interpret sarcasm, humor or emotion and she isn’t always sure why people do what they do. But behind all that is a woman with a sweet disposition and a big heart.

Britt-Marie unexpectedly leaves her cheating husband when she can no longer ignore that he is, in fact, cheating. When circumstances become too obvious to turn a blind eye, she decides she must go. She gets a job as caretaker of a recreation center in a small collapsing town named Borg, where most of the businesses have closed and the locals are barely holding on. Britt-Marie finds herself in a dirty recreation center no one uses (with a rat as a regular visitor) next door to a pizzeria/car repair shop/general store. Despite her best intentions to stay out of the way and simply do her job, she is drawn into the daily lives of a group of children needing a soccer coach and other local misfits who seem happy, if at odds with the world.

Though I enjoyed “Britt-Marie Was Here”, it felt so much like a book that almost, almost reached it’s real potential. Britt-Marie is a sweet character in many ways, but lacks the depth that would have made me care even more about her and her fate. The story itself has plenty of amusing moments and colorful people, but then ends feeling a bit unresolved. It felt like Backman had a wonderful premise for a book – the stage was set, the characters sketched out, the story began… and then it fell a little flat. Almost like he didn’t know where the story and characters were supposed to go in the end.

Not as amazing as “A Man Called Ove: A Novel” but still full of gentle warmth and sweet moments, “Britt-Marie Was Here” is a good book, it’s just not a great one.

The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware

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Lo Blacklock, a journalist for a travel magazine, has been given the opportunity of sailing away on the Aurora for a week long luxury cruise. The Aurora is a small, intimate ship with only a few cabins and the select special guests who were picked for her first voyage. Mixed in with socialites and other journalists, Lo is ready to relax and enjoy the plush beds, fancy food and endless champagne.

On her first night on the ship Lo is getting ready for the formal dinner and she realizes she forgot some of her makeup. She knocks next door, at Cabin 10, and borrows mascara from the woman there before going back to her cabin to finish her preparations.

The night goes as planned; beautiful dinner, schmoozing with the other attendees and drinking a little too much.  After a mostly pleasant evening, Lo returns to her cabin to snuggle down into her bed for her first real night of sleep in a week.

Then, a scream. A splash. Lo rushes to her balcony only to see swirling dark waters and what she thinks might be blood on the glass of Cabin 10. But before she can process what might have happened, the blood is gone, the night is silent again.

When she investigates the cabin next door with security, it’s empty. They inform her that the planned guest for Cabin 10 never arrived and that no passenger is missing. The cabin is bare, as if that woman had never existed.

Now Lo must get to the bottom of what she heard and saw, while trapped on a small boat with a group of people she doesn’t know. Who was that woman? Was she murdered? Was Lo dreaming? What really happened that night?

“The Woman in Cabin 10” is a claustrophobic murder mystery with a few surprising twists to keep us turning those pages. Eery and engrossing, this book is hard to put down. Ware has a talent for picking locations for murders that are deliciously creepy in their own natural ways. A glass house in the heart of a forest (In a Dark, Dark Wood) and now a small boat in the middle of an empty ocean.

After finishing this novel, you’ll check the locks on your doors before sleeping at night and possibly think twice about that vacation you were planning.

After all, boats can be very dangerous places.

Release date: July 19, 2016

Leave Me by Gayle Forman

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Sometimes being an adult feels too hard. The constant obligations. The daily responsibilities. The million tiny pieces that pile up to overwhelm us until it all feels impossible.

Until we just want to run away.

Maribeth, a mother of twins who works full time as a magazine editor, does just that.

She’s so busy with scheduling, shuttling, editing, meetings, cooking, answering emails and dealing with the stress of having two twin babies and a husband who doesn’t help out – that she doesn’t realize she’s having a heart attack until it’s almost too late.

After emergency heart surgery and a measly week in the hospital, Maribeth returns home to recuperate, only to realize that she’ll never be given that opportunity. Her husband treats her recovery like an imposition and her children still demand all of her that they did before. When she begins to feel worse rather than better, she makes the radical decision that everyone wishes they could make at one point or another when life just feels like too much to handle.

She leaves.

Maribeth packs a duffel bag, extracts some money from the bank and exits her life with an ease that surprises even her.

But a little time and some perspective can go a long way. While hiding out in her new apartment in her new city with new friends, Maribeth is finally able to be honest with herself, and those she loves, for the first time in many years.

In “Leave Me” Forman writes human nature in a way that lets us see ourselves in her characters. There is no major villain or insurmountable obstacle that takes Maribeth out of the realm of our everyday reality. She is just a person with the same problems, emotions and obligations as the rest of us. Her story feels refreshing and genuine.

And it is not just a book in which you can vicariously relish the liberation of leaving everything behind as an adult. (Though that part was quite enjoyable, I admit.) It’s about love and all that love entails. The terror. The responsibility. The joy.

It’s about how we can give so much of ourselves to others, that we lose ourselves.

And how maybe, sometimes, running away is the only way to find your way back home.

Release date: September 6, 2016

We’re All Damaged by Matthew Norman

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The lesson here . . . Sometimes people throw things away. That doesn’t mean those things aren’t really, really good. Most of the time, it just means that person didn’t know what they had.

In the style of Jonathan Tropper, Matthew Norman writes a humorous middle-age self discovery novel about a man named Andy.

Andy runs away from Omaha after his marriage falls apart, he causes a scene at his best friends wedding and loses his job. He lives in a tiny apartment in New York working as a bartender with an angry cat who he occasionally feeds cap’n crunch. Despite doing his best to avoid his hometown where his ex-wife, ex-best friend and family live, he suddenly has to go back when he finds out his grandfather is dying.

When he arrives home, he discovers that his ex-wife now lives with her new boyfriend in his old house, his mom has undergone a makeover to become a big right-wing radio personality and his ex-best friend is still mad at him. As he navigates each of the relationships he ran away from confronting, he also has to find a way to say goodbye to his grandpa.

Then he meets a young lady named Daisy. Daisy is quirky, mysterious and randomly decides she wants to make Andy whole again. She is determined to help him dress better, recover from his heartbreak and mend his life.

Though the plot is a bit typical – middle aged man is dumped by his wife, leaves his life in ruins and runs away before being forced to come home and confront/fix all his previous problems while he happens to meet a ‘different’ woman (she has tattoos! she dresses creatively!) who makes him see himself in a new way – the book is an enjoyable read. The ending is not extremely predictable and the characters don’t all fall into perfectly happy endings, which was much more satisfying than if they had.

If you liked “This is Where I Leave You” and “The Rosie Project” you will enjoy “We’re All Damaged” as well. A slightly wacky novel about getting back on your feet after life throws you a few curveballs, “We’re All Damaged” is a fun novel filled with humor, drama and devious squirrels.