The Twelve Days of Dash and Lily

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Remember Dash & Lily? Kismet in the Strand Bookstore in NY! Mysterious notebooks, book love and adventures!

Dash and Lily found each other through a series of challenges left by Lily in a red moleskine notebook at the Strand in Dash & Lily’s Book of Dares, the original novel by Rachel Cohn & David Levithan. Extremely cute and clever, it gave us bibliophiles the warm and fuzzies all the way to the last page.

Now we have our sequel, The Twelve Days of Dash & Lily. Set one year after Dash & Lily fall for each other, fans of their first escapade will notice the change in tone in the initial few chapters. Quite serious and a bit sad, the book begins with Lily trying to take care of her grandpa after he has a heart attack. She isn’t her usual optimistic self, isn’t excited for christmas and to make matters worse, she and Dash seem to have drifted apart in their relationship.

When Lily ditches school, runs away from her family and feels completely unreachable; Dash decides it’s time to intervene. He arranges a set of clues to lead Lily on her own adventure. Each clue rekindles her joy in christmas and leads her back to him, and all those who love her.

Though not as warm or wondrous as the original – Dash & Lily enthusiasts will appreciate this second dose of the adorable pair. This bittersweet sequel is worth picking up to experience what happens next in their story. It brings back a little of that unique Dash & Lily magic to get you in the spirit for the holiday season.

And, fair warning, it might make you deathly afraid of glitter.

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Britt-Marie Was Here by Fredrik Backman

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Britt-Marie is a woman with challenges. A bit OCD, a bit unaware of social graces, a bit awkward and overly straight forward – Britt-Marie is easily misunderstood. She gives suggestions that come off as criticisms, she doesn’t easily interpret sarcasm, humor or emotion and she isn’t always sure why people do what they do. But behind all that is a woman with a sweet disposition and a big heart.

Britt-Marie unexpectedly leaves her cheating husband when she can no longer ignore that he is, in fact, cheating. When circumstances become too obvious to turn a blind eye, she decides she must go. She gets a job as caretaker of a recreation center in a small collapsing town named Borg, where most of the businesses have closed and the locals are barely holding on. Britt-Marie finds herself in a dirty recreation center no one uses (with a rat as a regular visitor) next door to a pizzeria/car repair shop/general store. Despite her best intentions to stay out of the way and simply do her job, she is drawn into the daily lives of a group of children needing a soccer coach and other local misfits who seem happy, if at odds with the world.

Though I enjoyed “Britt-Marie Was Here”, it felt so much like a book that almost, almost reached it’s real potential. Britt-Marie is a sweet character in many ways, but lacks the depth that would have made me care even more about her and her fate. The story itself has plenty of amusing moments and colorful people, but then ends feeling a bit unresolved. It felt like Backman had a wonderful premise for a book – the stage was set, the characters sketched out, the story began… and then it fell a little flat. Almost like he didn’t know where the story and characters were supposed to go in the end.

Not as amazing as “A Man Called Ove: A Novel” but still full of gentle warmth and sweet moments, “Britt-Marie Was Here” is a good book, it’s just not a great one.

The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware

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Lo Blacklock, a journalist for a travel magazine, has been given the opportunity of sailing away on the Aurora for a week long luxury cruise. The Aurora is a small, intimate ship with only a few cabins and the select special guests who were picked for her first voyage. Mixed in with socialites and other journalists, Lo is ready to relax and enjoy the plush beds, fancy food and endless champagne.

On her first night on the ship Lo is getting ready for the formal dinner and she realizes she forgot some of her makeup. She knocks next door, at Cabin 10, and borrows mascara from the woman there before going back to her cabin to finish her preparations.

The night goes as planned; beautiful dinner, schmoozing with the other attendees and drinking a little too much.  After a mostly pleasant evening, Lo returns to her cabin to snuggle down into her bed for her first real night of sleep in a week.

Then, a scream. A splash. Lo rushes to her balcony only to see swirling dark waters and what she thinks might be blood on the glass of Cabin 10. But before she can process what might have happened, the blood is gone, the night is silent again.

When she investigates the cabin next door with security, it’s empty. They inform her that the planned guest for Cabin 10 never arrived and that no passenger is missing. The cabin is bare, as if that woman had never existed.

Now Lo must get to the bottom of what she heard and saw, while trapped on a small boat with a group of people she doesn’t know. Who was that woman? Was she murdered? Was Lo dreaming? What really happened that night?

“The Woman in Cabin 10” is a claustrophobic murder mystery with a few surprising twists to keep us turning those pages. Eery and engrossing, this book is hard to put down. Ware has a talent for picking locations for murders that are deliciously creepy in their own natural ways. A glass house in the heart of a forest (In a Dark, Dark Wood) and now a small boat in the middle of an empty ocean.

After finishing this novel, you’ll check the locks on your doors before sleeping at night and possibly think twice about that vacation you were planning.

After all, boats can be very dangerous places.

Release date: July 19, 2016